Acute effects of static stretching on isokinetic thigh strenght on modern dancers


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Agopyan A. , Tekin D., Ünal M., Kurtel H. , Turan G., Ersöz A.

Journal Of Sports Medicine And Physical Fitness, vol.53, no.5, pp.538-550, 2013 (Journal Indexed in SCI Expanded)

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 53 Issue: 5
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Title of Journal : Journal Of Sports Medicine And Physical Fitness
  • Page Numbers: pp.538-550

Abstract

Citations & impact 

Aim

The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of static stretching in dominant leg flexor muscle groups on concentric isokinetic leg extension and flexion peak torque (PT), peak torque % body weight (PT%BW) and total work (TW) at 60, 180 and 300 °.s-1 in stretched and non-stretched limbs of modern dancers.

Methods

Twenty-six trained modern dancers volunteered in this study. On the first measurement, isokinetic tests were performed on dominant and non-dominant legs. On the second measurement, the dominant leg flexors were stretched using 3 unassisted and 1 assisted static stretching exercises (each 4x15 seconds; 10-second rest). After the stretching, isokinetic tests were repeated on both legs.

Results

The results indicated a positive increase in strength in the stretched (PT%BW, TW) and non-stretched (PT, PT%BW, TW) limbs in flexion at 180°s-1 (P<0.05). We observed a positive increase (P<0.05) in the stretched limb (180 and 300°.s-1, TW; 300°.s-1, PT%BW) in extension whereas an acute decrease (P<0.05) was observed in both legs (60˚.s-1, PT and PT%BW).

Conclusion

Our findings indicated a possible positive effect of static stretching at high angular velocities on the strength production of isokinetic contraction in stretched and non-stretched muscles. However, due to its negative effect on the extensor muscle groups, we think using static stretching is required attention before maximal strength exercises.

Citations & impact 

Aim

The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of static stretching in dominant leg flexor muscle groups on concentric isokinetic leg extension and flexion peak torque (PT), peak torque % body weight (PT%BW) and total work (TW) at 60, 180 and 300 °.s-1 in stretched and non-stretched limbs of modern dancers.

Methods

Twenty-six trained modern dancers volunteered in this study. On the first measurement, isokinetic tests were performed on dominant and non-dominant legs. On the second measurement, the dominant leg flexors were stretched using 3 unassisted and 1 assisted static stretching exercises (each 4x15 seconds; 10-second rest). After the stretching, isokinetic tests were repeated on both legs.

Results

The results indicated a positive increase in strength in the stretched (PT%BW, TW) and non-stretched (PT, PT%BW, TW) limbs in flexion at 180°s-1 (P<0.05). We observed a positive increase (P<0.05) in the stretched limb (180 and 300°.s-1, TW; 300°.s-1, PT%BW) in extension whereas an acute decrease (P<0.05) was observed in both legs (60˚.s-1, PT and PT%BW).

Conclusion

Our findings indicated a possible positive effect of static stretching at high angular velocities on the strength production of isokinetic contraction in stretched and non-stretched muscles. However, due to its negative effect on the extensor muscle groups, we think using static stretching is required attention before maximal strength exercises.